Thee Comic Column #110: Wytches

WYTCHES-Cover-1-Final-7cd41I will admit that when I first heard about Scott Snyder and Jock’s Wytches my interest was tinged with a small swathe of trepidation. I don’t mean to sound like a dick, but after recently re-reading Snyder and Sean Murphy’s The Wake I wasn’t too hot on the idea of jumping on a new series by Snyder. This is because, in The Wake‘s case, I love the set-up, LOVE the art (Sean Murphy can do no wrong in my book) and love the characters, love the story and the way it’s two stories that tell one bigger story. What I didn’t necessarily love however was the ending. Honestly, it left me a bit flat. Of course it’s true that the journey is just as important as the destination, but I just don’t know if the ending to The Wake does the rest of the story – and oh what a story – any justice. That more than anything else may be what bothers me about the book and had me a little trepidatious about starting out on a new path with Mr. Snyder at the helm.

Thee Comic Column #43 – Snyder & Murphy’s The Wake

image courtesy of terrazero.com

Okay, I’ve been waiting for this one for MONTHS. After spending an absurd amount of money to ensure that I get to see British Industrial legends GodFlesh in not one but two cities I found myself a tad light in the wallet and thus waited an extra two weeks to hit The Comic Bug this month. And when I finally did make it in last week I had not only the first but also the second issue of this new Vertigo series by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy waiting for me. And my friends, The Wake did not disappoint.

Thee Comic Column #4 Punk Rock Jesus

When I first read about Punk Rock Jesus in Comic Shop Insider I was intrigued. I’m not one to fall in for the tropes of ‘punk’ – I’m pretty much of the opinion that nothing has really been ‘punk’ since about 1979. HOWEVER – I’ve always thought the real-world, over-used visual stylings of safety pins, liberty spikes and tattoes can still be used to great effect in fictional realms. There’s something about having grown up in the late 70’s, early 80’s, when movies and comics were using the left over punk imagery to shape very nihilistic and often destitute characters and tableaus for their visions of the  future. Think about Chris Claremont’s early-eighties Uncanny X-men and his Morlocks, or cinema wise think Mad Max*, as well as pretty much every cop movie or show at the time, where the hoods often had mohawks, chains, spiked wristbands and of course, switchblades.

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