The Joup Friday Album: Fever Ray

Fever Ray DebutIt’s been a bit. A lot of us at the Joup staff took a bit off around the Holidays, something I don’t normally do, however my holiday spirit has miraculously been rekindled over the previous two months. All that’s come and gone now though; I ended up spending the somersault into 2018 in Chicago, called home for a funeral. I haven’t been back for a winter since I moved, going on twelve years ago, and it was a bit of an eye-opener to walk into 0, -1 and -2 degree temperatures, bolstered by a windchill factor that was often double digits below zero; as if the passing of my wonderful Uncle Phil wasn’t terrible enough. Something about all of it hit me in a strangely creative way, and I returned to a rainy LaLaLand with a hankering for dark, brooding electronic music.

Joup Confessions…

Skid Row FrontOkay, this is a big one.

First, I completely agree with Tommy from last week’s inaugural Joup Confessions… column when he said he doesn’t enjoy things ironically. To quote Mike Patton and the Dillinger Escape Plan, irony is a dead scene. You own it or you toss it, one or the other. And with that said it should be clear that when I say when the time is right I enjoy me the HELL out of Skid Row’s eponymous debut album from 1989 I fuckin’ mean it!

 

 

 

Underrated: Faith No More’s “King for a Day, Fool for a Lifetime”

faithnomoreEveryone knows Faith No More for their absolutely massive hit “Epic” from 1989’s “The Real Thing.”  The band’s mix of metal, rap, and funk struck a nerve in both metal heads and pop scenesters alike.  It was everywhere.  Radio.  MTV.  There was even a mild controversy over the video’s use of a fish flopping and gasping out of water.  Then came 1992’s “Angel Dust.”  While eclectic and influential, the record did not perform near as well as its predecessor.  Hardcore FNM fans touted it as a masterpiece (which it is), but the fair weather fans and masses jumped ship along with lead guitarist Jim Martin.  With Mike Patton now becoming the more principal song writer, the band began to drop some of the rap-metal and glam rock that had propelled them to stardom in the first place.  Replacing it was more experimentation and forays into progressive rock.

Translate