Endless Loop: An Ending (Ascent)

brianenoHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“An Ending (Ascent)” by Brian Eno

Brian Eno’s “An Ending (Ascent),” from 1983’s Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks, is easily one of my favorite pieces of music of all time, probably top five even.  It’s just so wonderfully moving, a haunting and beautiful instrumental that could score just about any moment in time, from bittersweet elation to quiet despair.  It can bring tears just sounding as it does without any discernable context whatsoever, just the notes, the melody, the sound.  And I love it for that.  That feeling is about as close to god as I’m ever likely to feel.

The Joup Friday Album

melissa

“Yo, Melissa, Imma let you finish, but I have one of the best Friday Albums of all time.”

No one invited me this week, but I have to take the stage. I have to mention it, this Elephant in the room (well it was once a Donkey, then a…whatever, then begrudgingly welcomed back as an Elephant when it looked like it might get its trunk on the peanut-keys. ‘Off she went with a trumpety-trump, trump, trump, trump’). It’s been two weeks since the combined nationwide clapping and gasp abruptly went reverberating around the world like the amplified unveiling of a waterfall of severed genitalia. To think, I was once torpid with apprehension at the prospect of the Romney-bot, who in retrospect looks like a chuckling uncle with no more nefarious-a-skeleton in his closet than a used-car lot, albeit with a dog strapped to the top of one of his inventory.

The Joup Friday Album: David Bowie – Outside

OutsidebowieJoe:

If you do a search for David Bowie on Joup you will find a total of 20 articles of or relating to him. I wanted to begin this article with that little tidbit in order to illustrate a little of what the man means to us here at Joup. This is also the only thing nearing an explanation you will get for the fact that all or most of our regular contributors have spent the days and, well, will probably  spend the weeks after his death writing about him. Due to travel arrangements I missed my original turn for the Joup Friday Album last week but have come out in a better position to do what I had intended, as I spent the week visiting my co-publisher Shawn Baker in Los Angeles and had the rare opportunity to do this piece together, in person no less.

The Joup Friday Album: ‘Niandra LaDes (& Usually Just a T-Shirt)’ John Frusciante

lrg-253-jfmakeupA mind is a terrible thing to waste, but damn if it isn’t fun to do so. Self destruction can be an expressway to artistic Nirvana, the catch is that you have to ultimately shed your physical self to get there, as someone who traded under that heavenly appellation would famously find out. ‘The dead do not improve’, just segue into a misunderstood and misappropriated Valhalla defined by the hands of a cumulative bastard- hack comprised of millions with their inaccurate imaginings. In 1991, on the last page of a British Metal magazine only just starting to reinvent itself as Cobain & Co’s hurricane gathered on the horizon, was an interview with John Frusciante that was epiphanic to my adolescent mind. It was my first glimpse at his idiosyncratic way of thinking – more outlandish and Dionysian than his bandmates could ever conceive of being. The interviewer completely failed to deal with his intellect (or at least, decided it would be funnier to feign ignorance and kowtow to the meat-headed readership), and Frusciante blew my impressionable young head off shoulders that had just recently known my ‘rebellious’ hair’s first contact.

The Joup Friday Album – Sixth Edition Robert Calvert’s “Lucky Leif and the Longships”

image courtesy of makeyourowntaste.wordpress.com

Hawkwind is a band that has alluded me my entire life. If I walked into a room and Hawkwind was playing on the turntable I might be able to guess what it was just based on what I know about the group, but I am wholly unfamiliar with their music. And yet the author of my pick for this week’s edition of The Joup Friday Album was penned by Hawkwind’s frontman. How’s this then? you might ask. Well, you see my entry to Lucky Leif and the Longships was not through Robert Calvert, it was through the album’s producer/collaborator Brian Eno.

Another Death Panel

image courtesy of kids.britannica.com

image courtesy of kids.britannica.com

Dying as some decent music plays.

Many a round table discussion was had with my friends, colleagues, classmates, and roommates when I was in college, topics running the gauntlet from gender issues to geo-political “isms,” drug use to art, collective hopes and dreams to pop culture analysis.  Opinions varied.  Tempers sometimes flared and cooled.  And all the while through a lovely and gentle haze of suds and smoke, ideas flourished.

35 Albums in 35 Years: 1983

In an ongoing attempt to bleed my opinions all over your computer screen, I’m selecting one album from every year that I’ve been alive that has some sort of significance to me…and then writing about it.  Welcome back to 35 Albums in 35 Years.

 

brianenoapollo1983: Brian Eno’s Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks

Drop the needle, take a step back, close your eyes…and float.  A meditative state.  Serenity.  Tranquility.  The feeling of weightlessness in space or under water.  Eyes closed and legs crossed.  Deep breaths.  Transcendence.  Such is Brian Eno’s 1983 ode to the Apollo moon missions, Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks, the perfect sonic picture of the wonder of space travel.

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