The Joup Friday Album: Saturday Morning Cartoons’ Greatest Hits

saturdaymorningSomething I don’t really see much of anymore are compilation tribute albums, those sonic testaments of inspiration and capital assembled together from a who’s who of whatever the kids are listening to and assorted old stalwarts to craft a quick and profitable loving homage to one of our respected audio forebears.  I don’t mean to sound snarky.  I’m not too good for these cash ins, as my old CD collection is proof to, but it seems like they used to be all over the place, lauding such artists as Depeche Mode, or Joy Division, or Led Zeppelin, or The Carpenters, but have now faded into relative obscurity with so much other 90’s detritus.

Endless Loop: We Live Again

beckHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“We Live Again” by Beck

Endless Loop: The Wooden Song

buttholesurfersHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“The Wooden Song” by The Butthole Surfers

The Joup Friday Album: sElf – Breakfast with Girls

image courtesy of self.is

This week’s entry as Joup’s Friday Album – a weekly column where we try to give our readers a nice musical pick-me-up to help transition out of the work week and into the hard-won freedoms of the weekend – was down to two albums until just a few moments ago. These are two albums that I have known for years and once again recently had in heavy rotation. I have a long and deep history with both of these pieces of music and, perhaps not surprisingly both were recorded and came out around the same time.

Album Review: Polvo ‘Siberia’

Polvo_Siberia_LP_11183Of all the recently reunited 90s Alt Rock outfits, the lesser spotted Polvo stake a more valid claim than most to a second stab at existence, having not really been paid their dues the first time around. Unlike most reunions, Polvo’s wasn’t necessarily fuelled by a groundswell of born again devotees voting with their feet for reappraisal, and it might just be this lack of expectation that has them sounding like no time at all has passed between their demise in 1998 and their reformation a decade later. Despite some deceptively pedestrian Indie distortion slinging, the woozy cephalopodic tremolo and angle grinding of Ash Bowie and Dave Brylawski’s intermingling riffs fray at the ends with non sequiturs that distort the space and time signatures of Brian Quast’s beats and Steve Popson’s humming undercurrent.

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