The Joup Friday Album: Earth ‘Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II’

Earth Angels of Darkness Demons of Light 2 Earth specialize in dreary forays into the subtly supernatural that, in the hands of a lesser band, would be laughable, but if you use these records to soundtrack the news, it’s easy to believe in demons. Judging by recent promotional shots of the band, Dylan Carlson is increasingly taking on the appearance of some world-weary, handlebar mustachioed Midwestern prospector — lines furrowing his once Elfin face.

Basement Dwelling// Gorillaz: Humanz

     It’s bothersome to hear people talk about Gorillaz. Sure, Gorillaz are a widely loved and celebrated act, and they have been for nearly 20 years now. But one of their greatest strengths is also one of their biggest setbacks.

It’s idiotic to me that the animated world of Gorillaz, co-created by legendary underground comic artist Jamie Hewlett, and which serves as the stylistic umbrella for a global and multigenerational collaborative music project, proves to be such a turnoff for people.

The Joup Friday Album: DJ Shadow – Endtroducing

endtroducingIt’s Friday night and my weekend has begun in the way I love most – I’m sitting at my favorite coffee shop working on a new short story waiting for my baby to get off work. The story was having a little trouble flowing and that’s when I remembered that I recently put the legendary Endtroducing by DJ Shadow back on my iPod. If there’s one thing I learned about this record when my good friend Keller introduced me to it back in 2011 – yeah, I was late to this party for sure – it’s that Endtroducing is a powerful catalyst for the isolation and introspection of creative writing. Maybe not for everyone, but definitely for me. Full Disclosure: the version I have is one I purposely left the interstitial dialogue tracks off of in order to keep the otherwise mostly instrumental flow, so when you cue this up and hit play you’ll be hearing a slightly different version than me, but that doesn’t matter. The thing’s a classic and I only resorted to the blasphemy of altering it to ensure it keeps me where I use it to go.

Joup Friday Album: Washed Out “Life of Leisure”

Washed Out - Life of Leisure The first time I heard “Feel it All Around” was watching Portlandia last summer. If you’ve seen or know the show, the tune acts as the opening theme song. And upon hearing it I had to know who, what, where and how. What I came up with initially was a group (which I would later find out was just Ernest Greene) called Washed Out. I put it on the back burner for some reason until recently and then it just hit me like a wonderful hazy memory…and that Portlandia show is terrific as well. Fred Armisen cracks me up, but that is another topic for another day.

Sh!t Song Of The Week “Leader Of The Band”

 

 

Sh!t Song Of The Week “Winds of Change” Jefferson Starship

winds of shit
The sh!t song of the week is “Winds of Change” by Jefferson Starship. I know that it’s too easy picking on Jefferson Starship because of their mega fluffy hit songs like “We Built This City” and “Nothing is Going to Stop Us Now”. As far as I am concerned the whole 80’s Starship catalogue is the soundtrack for Richard Gere’s gerbil escapades. The Jefferson Starship of the 80’s were so far removed from their original roots of Jefferson Airplane’s brand of psychedelic hippie rock it is astounding . Where did the white rabbit from the Bay Area go? Did they find somebody to love and just give up? When did Airplane became Starship? Why did this happen? I’m thinking it probably had something to do with cocaine. I saw that episode of “WKRP” when the record executive tries to push a new record on Johnny Fever and offers up some booger sugar to sweeten up the deal so I am figuring this may have been the case with “Winds of Change“. I was also shocked that Howard Hesseman passed on free coke even in a fictitious scenario. Anyway you want to slice it Jefferson Starship are widely known to many as purveyors of schmaltzy 80’s hits that you can often hear at Walgreens when making the import decisions in life like going with generic brand of KY jelly instead of that expensive brand name stuff. The song I chose this week is not one of Jefferson Starship’s best known songs but it is equally on point with the above mentioned songs. The video for this song is also cut from the same jizz rag because it is a light rock, Heart rip off song but the set design in the video would lead you believe that Jefferson Starship are a heavy metal band with a wall of generic Marshall stacks, an eighteen piece drum kit with double kick drums behind them and last but not least, they have a fucking keytar involved. Do the math. Terrible album art + Shit song + Coked up video conception = “Winds of Change“.  This is just my two cents on a three cent matter but the song “Winds of Change” by Jefferson Starship strongly qualifies to be the shit song of the week.

The Joup Friday Album: JSBX – Now I Got Worry

jsbx worryThis band! This album!

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion’s 1996 Now I Got Worry takes me back. I mean, it really takes me back. Back to a time that seems like it was in a galaxy long ago and far, far away, where the world was a decidedly different place. Maybe that’s why I have trouble going back to an album like this on a regular basis regardless of how much it kicks; nostalgia is a relative phenomenon, relative to the experiencer, and the older you get the more it plays a funny game with time. The world early-20’s Shawn experienced in the mid 90’s was relatively different from the world that existed twenty years before that, so much so that at the time the late 60’s/early 70’s seemed archaic in many ways. However, jump up another twenty or so years and you land here in the NOW and guess what? Relative perspective – perceived through me as the aforementioned experiencer of course – shows that 1996 really wasn’t that different from 1976 or even 1966, because 2016/17 is exponentially different than that starting point in our time line.

Translate