The Joup Friday Album: Julee Cruise – Floating into the Night

Floating into the NightIf there’s an album title more evocative of Twin Peaks – I mean other than the soundtracks that bear the town’s name – I’ve not found it. Especially I feel a strong thread between this album and the second half of the original pilot episode of the show, where half of the teenage cast runs around in the night with various secretive agendas, starting fights, burying secrets and forgetting to put air in their sister’s bicycle tires. I was a teenager myself when I saw that and first experienced Cruise’s music through David Lynch’s lens, and it shaped me in a way that a lot of the times I’m out in the night with a debaucherous agenda at hand -with admittedly is not very often anymore – echoes of this album provide my interior soundtrack.

Joup Confessions… Alan Parson’s Eye in the Sky

Alan ParsonsI love Alan Parsons Project’s Eye in the Sky. I mean, really truly love it. Not in the way I love Sticky Fingers, or the second side of Down on the Upside, or the new Afghan Whigs record, but I love it nonetheless. It’s not something I can listen to often – probably because it sometimes induces narcoleptic seizures in me, many of which are followed by or experienced alongside dry mouth, diarrhea, really brutal rashes that resemble K.D. Lang profile. Sometimes these rashes occur on my stomach and then I scratch them and my abdomen bleeds and the friction from that can sometimes – TMI I know – cause prolonged erections, fits of rage or thoughts of suicide (it’s kinda nice when those three all occur at once because it feels like the description I once heard a homeless man give of a party he attended in 1985 at George the Animal Steele’s house, a party where there were people dressed in and snorting copious amounts of denim, staples, vanilla extract, Monster energy drink, Gordon’s fish sticks, and raw, smashed unsalted peanuts. Smashed like with a ball peen hammer.

Sh!t Song of the Week “Eye in the Sky”

Alan ParsonsHave you ever been driving in traffic trying to find something halfway decent to listen to on the radio? There is a station in Chicago called 87.7 Me TV FM and it is a go to on my presets when I am looking for oldies or something to clear my head after a loud day. Maybe one minute you will hear “Brandy” by Looking Glass, “Lonely Too Long” by the Rascals or some Motown stuff like a song by Marvin Gaye or the Supremes. However, seven times out of ten I hear some really bad songs and they wind up getting stuck in my head and it seems like the bad songs dig deeper in to your psyche and become perpetual earworms.

The Joup Friday Album “Get The Knack”

 

The Knack

The Joup Friday Album: Earth ‘Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II’

Earth Angels of Darkness Demons of Light 2 Earth specialize in dreary forays into the subtly supernatural that, in the hands of a lesser band, would be laughable, but if you use these records to soundtrack the news, it’s easy to believe in demons. Judging by recent promotional shots of the band, Dylan Carlson is increasingly taking on the appearance of some world-weary, handlebar mustachioed Midwestern prospector — lines furrowing his once Elfin face.

Basement Dwelling// Gorillaz: Humanz

     It’s bothersome to hear people talk about Gorillaz. Sure, Gorillaz are a widely loved and celebrated act, and they have been for nearly 20 years now. But one of their greatest strengths is also one of their biggest setbacks.

It’s idiotic to me that the animated world of Gorillaz, co-created by legendary underground comic artist Jamie Hewlett, and which serves as the stylistic umbrella for a global and multigenerational collaborative music project, proves to be such a turnoff for people.

The Joup Friday Album: DJ Shadow – Endtroducing

endtroducingIt’s Friday night and my weekend has begun in the way I love most – I’m sitting at my favorite coffee shop working on a new short story waiting for my baby to get off work. The story was having a little trouble flowing and that’s when I remembered that I recently put the legendary Endtroducing by DJ Shadow back on my iPod. If there’s one thing I learned about this record when my good friend Keller introduced me to it back in 2011 – yeah, I was late to this party for sure – it’s that Endtroducing is a powerful catalyst for the isolation and introspection of creative writing. Maybe not for everyone, but definitely for me. Full Disclosure: the version I have is one I purposely left the interstitial dialogue tracks off of in order to keep the otherwise mostly instrumental flow, so when you cue this up and hit play you’ll be hearing a slightly different version than me, but that doesn’t matter. The thing’s a classic and I only resorted to the blasphemy of altering it to ensure it keeps me where I use it to go.

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