35 Albums in 35 Years: 1985

In an ongoing attempt to bleed my opinions all over your computer screen, I’m selecting one album from every year that I’ve been alive that has some sort of significance to me…and then writing about it.  Welcome back to 35 Albums in 35 Years.

 

tomwaits1985: Tom Waits’ Rain Dogs

Some years seem to generate so many more albums that hold special places in my heart than others.  It becomes a challenge to not only pick one to write about, but to even narrow the number down to a manageable level to begin with.  1985 is one of those years.  I kind of agonized over which record to choose.  In the end though, there was really only one direction to go in.

Underrated: Marilyn Manson’s “Mechanical Animals”

marilynmansonI’ve decided that I don’t care about your opinions on Marilyn Manson.  I don’t want to hear them, so keep them to yourselves.  But here’s mine.

Let’s just throw it out there: Marilyn Manson’s 1998 album Mechanical Animals is vastly underrated.  There.  I said it.  And I meant it.  Though it was a commercial success, the record seems to take a lot of slag because of Manson’s waning popularity, his propensity for douchebaggery, and his later and ongoing lackluster output.  It suffers because its creator has become the butt of so many jokes.  Forgotten because, you know, the 90’s.  So, let’s revisit it.  Let’s put make-up on, don a suit of prosthetic, nipple-less breasts, curse and sneer, and give Mechanical Animals another chance.  It deserves it.  And so do we.

Cue the Bugles Triumphant

(Or…the article in which Tommy probably gets too personal.)

Cue Sonic Youth’s “Compilation Blues.”

Another Death Panel

image courtesy of kids.britannica.com

image courtesy of kids.britannica.com

Dying as some decent music plays.

Many a round table discussion was had with my friends, colleagues, classmates, and roommates when I was in college, topics running the gauntlet from gender issues to geo-political “isms,” drug use to art, collective hopes and dreams to pop culture analysis.  Opinions varied.  Tempers sometimes flared and cooled.  And all the while through a lovely and gentle haze of suds and smoke, ideas flourished.

Pussy Galore! A Definitive Ranking of the Bond Movie Themes

jamesbondThe first cassette I ever bought for myself with my own money was either a compilation of 80’s hits that featured Duran Duran, The Thompson Twins, and Quiet Riot among others or a collection of theme songs from James Bond movies.  For the sake of this article, I’m going with the tape of James Bond movie themes.  It was awesome.  Every theme from Dr. No to For Your Eyes Only was included, as well as some additional film score and incidental music.  I loved it.  I listened to that tape until the plastic casing cracked and the magnetic tape creased and warbled.  My affinity for Bond films was born in that moment, with a special place in my heart for all those opening credit tunes.  Oh, how they molded me.

35 Albums in 35 Years: 1981

In an ongoing attempt to bleed my opinions all over your computer screen, I’m selecting one album from every year that I’ve been alive that has some sort of significance to me…and then writing about it.  Welcome back to 35 Albums in 35 Years.

 

enobyrne1981: Brian Eno and David Byrne’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

35 Albums in 35 Years: 1980

In an ongoing attempt to bleed my opinions all over your computer screen, I’m selecting one album from every year that I’ve been alive that has some sort of significance to me…and then writing about it.  Welcome back to 35 Albums in 35 Years.

 

joydivisioncloser1980: Joy Division’s Closer

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