Drinking, Fighting, Fucking and Crying Title

Drinking, Fighting, F*&king, and Crying

Nurture My PigAh drinking. You know, it’s funny – the more often I come back around to each of these categories, the harder it is to find things to write about. I guess that’s because, with the exception of crying, which is pretty universal, two of the other three are pretty much a young man’s game, so to speak (no offense ladies, just throwing this out from my perspective). I mean, I still drink, but I don’t really go out drinking. And even when I do, it’s never like it used to be. And fighting? Well, you learn to avoid that early on or you end up a stain on the sidewalk or an intolerable MMA arsehole. And Fucking, well, that never goes away, but it becomes a more personal thing as you pick a mate and go about getting freaky in a more intimate, long-lasting manner. But drinking… there has to be more stories…

Endless Loop: Experiment in Terror

henrymanciniHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“Experiment in Terror” by Henry Mancini

Drinking, Fighting, Fucking and Crying Title

Drinking, Fighting, F*&King, and Crying

Gummo RabbitThis will be a quick one. And really, my usual go-to for a quick ‘crying’ song reference would be The Cure, pretty much anything they did in the Disintegration-era. I’m not taking that route today though (but I’m betting I will somewhere not too far off down the line – there’s at least one good ‘crying’ installment of this column that will center around juxtaposing Disintegration with James O’Barr’s The Crow). Instead, I’m taking this one at face value and going Orbison.

Endless Loop: The Albatross

elfpowerHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“The Albatross” by Elf Power

In 2000, somehow, someway, neo-psychedelic indie rock band Elf Power managed to record a song that heralds the arrival of the end of everything more effectively than a thousand doom metal bands.  How they did it is beyond me, but “The Albatross,” the epic and thundering closing track from the band’s The Winter Is Coming is my go-to for that sort of thing, a hallmark of doom-laden guitar rock.

Endless Loop: How to Disappear Completely

radioheadHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“How to Disappear Completely” by Radiohead

Maybe all of the old dystopian fears and nightmares came true.  Maybe there was something far more prophetic in those old tomes we read and studied in 9th and 10th grade than we ever believed, Huxley and Orwell tapping into some future feedback, foreshadowing everything.  Or maybe it’s all just some kind of Philip K. Dick fever dream gone completely off the rails.  Maybe I’m full of shit.  It doesn’t matter.  Things have gone askew.

Endless Loop: Big White Cloud

johncaleHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“Big White Cloud” by John Cale

If you could see any now deceased/defunct artist or band, who would it be?  Let’s say you have a time machine, or you can suddenly bend reality to your whim and witness some legendary artist perform at the height of his or her or their musical prowess…who do you see?  Who did you miss out on the first time around?  For me, it’s a three-way tie between Queen, Nirvana, and The Velvet Underground (though admittedly, I would happily take T. Rex or a pre-Brain Jones death Rolling Stones too).

The Joup Friday Album: Emerald Web – Dragon Wings and Wizard Tales

emeraldwebThe first sound we hear on experimental New Age duo Emerald Web’s 1979 album, Dragon Wings and Wizard Tales, is a whimsical flute floating in the breeze, like some errant minstrel passing by in the forest, inadvertently heralding the arrival of something far grander than he.  It sets the stage wonderfully.

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