Beautiful Brutality Episode #1: Blut Aus Nord’s The Work Which Tranforms God

The work which transforms god coverI’ve been wanting to do this column for some time. The impetus to share the often hard-won insights culled from three years spent delving deeper and deeper into the basement of the popularly-maligned Black Metal subculture of music is just too good to pass up. I’ve had a list of prospective records and bands that deserve to be written about in a somewhat critical manor for months, I just haven’t had the time. Now then, I do and as such I give to you Episode #1 of my new column here on Joup: Beautiful Brutality.

Thee Comic Column #104: The Return of A Voice in the Dark

A-Voice-In-the-Dark-Get-Your-Gun-1-CoverIt feels like MONTHS since Larime Taylor’s first story arc on his creator-owned A Voice in the Dark ended and I’ve felt pretty much every day since then, waiting for the new arc/new issue. If you read the book you know how damn good it is; a smart and sophisticated street-level story about a college student named Zoey who struggles – along with all the normal social and psychological struggles a college-aged girl would have – with having awakened an appetite for murder within herself after avenging a social wrong done to her best friend during the closing days of Zoey’s high school career. Originally Zoey thinks leaving home to attend college will remove her dark urges, but it’s not long before she finds herself once again in a position to justify murder. Things are complicated further when Zoey, whose uncle Zeke just happens to be a local homicide detective in the cozy college town of Cutter Circle, becomes involved in a whodunit on campus after young coeds begin turning up wearing their insides on the outside. Zoey’s position as the host of an anonymous call-in radio show meant to help both herself and other students vent their dark desires puts her in the middle of things, and as the story progresses Zoey finds she is anything but rehabilitated from her own dark longings…

The Joup Friday/Saturday Album (by way of an unrequested Joup Confession) weezer: ‘Everything Will Be Alright In The End

20140709165029!Cover_of_Weezer's_album_Everything_Will_Be_Alright_in_the_End

“What’s with these homies jacking my appellation?
Why do they got it on their front?”

Those despicable “Geek” T-Shirts…  as if ‘jocks’ hadn’t done enough to nerds throughout the ages, they have to re-appropriate their insult and adorn themselves with it, as well as other accoutrements like those clear lensed, thick rimmed glasses. I own a weezer T-shirt. Ain’t no one giving me kudos – ironic or otherwise – for wearing that testimony to social shortcomings.

Joup Confessions…

Skid Row FrontOkay, this is a big one.

First, I completely agree with Tommy from last week’s inaugural Joup Confessions… column when he said he doesn’t enjoy things ironically. To quote Mike Patton and the Dillinger Escape Plan, irony is a dead scene. You own it or you toss it, one or the other. And with that said it should be clear that when I say when the time is right I enjoy me the HELL out of Skid Row’s eponymous debut album from 1989 I fuckin’ mean it!

 

 

 

New Music Enthusiast’s Club: Latimer House

latimer houseLatimer House – All the Rage

There’s something to be said for old pop sounds that work and wind their way into newer, modern made music, the everlasting and transcending sonic tropes of the innovators that came before, like tapping into some kind of cosmic consciousness or current. Hailing from Prague, guitar pop quartet Latimer House wade in the soothing sounds of 60’s psych pop and 70’s rock and new wave on their album All the Rage, crafting quirky, yet familiar pop nuggets readily available for your consumption.

35…er…36 Albums in 35 Years: 2014

In an ongoing attempt to bleed my opinions all over your computer screen, I’m selecting one album from every year that I’ve been alive that has some sort of significance to me…and then writing about it. Welcome back to 35 Albums in 35 Years.

Okay, so I’ve already done 35 albums, but there have been plenty of great releases this year too, and I’ve kind of gotten used to writing these things over the last nine months, so let’s pick one. Shall we?

 

perturbator2014: Perturbator’s Dangerous Days

Thee Comic Column #103: John Carpenter’s Asylum

asylumFile this under the, “How the hell did I miss that?” category. I’ve been a fan of John Carpenter’s movies since I was probably somewhere in the vicinity of nine years old. The brutal Chicago winters often meant many weekdays after school were spent in front of the boob tube where the now classic first generations of the GIJOE and the Transformers cartoons tickled my imagination. And tickle they did, as by the time those cartoons ended I was usually inspired to break out my figures and while away the next few hours before bed immersed in the epic continuation of the perpetually unfolding narratives my figures remained defined by for months at a time (I coveted the chance the storytellers on the cartoons and comics of my favorite action figures had in constructing ongoing continuity so I learned to create my own). This was normally done in front of the tube as well, the various couches and bureaus of the living room transformed by my imagination into definitive locations in these stories, all acted out in front of the syndicated sitcoms that occupied the remainder of the afternoon before seven o’clock hit and Chicago’s WGN Channel 9 began their nightly movie. It was here, sometimes distracted, sometimes engulfed by various cinematic offerings from the 70’s and 80’s, that I first saw many a movie I am now crazy about. Chief among the favorites introduced to me by WGN were the films of John Carpenter.

Translate