Endless Loop: Love Is Blue

paulmauriatHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“Love Is Blue” by Paul Mauriat

If there is some supreme being out there, or a super race of creatures beyond our own limited understanding and perception watching and observing us, toying with us, playing with us for their own amusement and entertainment, I have one request for them. Just one thing that I want. So, here it goes:

Beneath the Panels #3: Nameless and the Tree of Life

Nameless02Way I see it, everything’s been fucked up since 2001 anyway. Since the towers came down – since the pylons fell on Trump 18 and Malkuth was gathered up into Yesod.”

Thee Comic Column #120: Re-reading Alan Moore’s Promethea

sophie 5 largeIf you have by chance encountered the new column I recently began to post here on Joup you’ll know that Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham’s new series Nameless has reawakened an old passion in me. The column, Beneath the Panels, is an attempt to investigate the Occult underpinnings of Nameless, and it’s really got me on my toes. Reading it you will no doubt see me illustrate how, when dealing with the Occult, it is very easy to get lost amid the hundreds of invisible wires that run between scores of disparate concepts and even seemingly conflicting ideologies. Many of these ideas end up connecting in ways that are not always obvious or even intuitive, however, getting to that point takes quite a bit of work! This is because contrary to what conventional wisdom would have you believe, the Occult is at its best a tributary of science; Magick is not sleight of hand or elaborate stage antics but an attempt to craft a unified theory of everything. This is why both in modern and medieval times Occult study draws from every world view possible – the early alchemists were as much scientists as philosophers, and the Chaos Magicians of the 80s and 90s were as influenced by Quantum Mechanics and Chaos Mathematics as they were by Austin Osman Spare or *ahem* Aleister Crowley. In diving back into this type of research – which I had taken a hiatus from for almost ten years – I found that there was no better place to go for a streamlined cram session than Alan Moore and JH Williams III’s Promethea, a comic book that not only features appearances by pretty much everybody and everything I’ve just gone on about above, but that for all intensive purposes is a primer on Magickal study and Occult theology.

The Joup Friday Album: The United States of America

usaalbumAs “The American Metaphysical Circus” begins, the atmosphere is indeed akin to that of a circus, a hodgepodge of sounds swirling along together in an audio soup. Ragtime dances play with classical marches and jazz numbers before subsiding as the electronic pulses take over and a female voice beckons you in. The mood is progressive. The ideas are many. The palette is open to an array of new sounds. Welcome to one of the most fantastic and experimental psych rock records of the 1960’s, the self-titled, sole release from The United States of America.

Endless Loop: Hybrid Moments

misfitsHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“Hybrid Moments” by The Misfits

I hate to admit it, but I was really, really late to The Misfits party. I was aware of them of course, being a fan of those first four Danzig records, but for some reason or another I just never paid them any attention. And that was wrong of me. It was at the insistence and persistence of my brother that I finally rectified that mistake, that I finally gave the legendary punk rock act a go. And that was right of me.

Beneath the Panels #2: The Enochian Themes of Nameless

img-grant-morrison-103316726745-109308If you haven’t read the first Beneath the Panels it’s on my personal blog here. Beneath the Panels isn’t going to become a regular feature, but I will probably continue it for the duration of Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham’s Nameless. After seeing how many words it took me to cover what basically amounted to just the first page of the book in that previous installment, I figured this column would be better served on Joup. That said, the idea of moving that first installment over, with all the re-embedding, setting links and what not seemed like a waste of time. Thus, I’m leaving #1 where it is and getting on with further revealing the MANY occult influences/ideas Morrison has once again worked into the ‘code’ of his new 6-issue book. Also, I’d like to note here that a major influence on my idea to do this column has been David Uzumeri‘s amazing annotations for other Morrison works, much of which can be found at Comics Alliance and also on Funnybook Babylon.

Thee Comic Column #119 – Inferno!

Could you pass the mustard please? I believe slathering my words – which I am about to eat – may go easier with a nice stone ground brown or perhaps even a lovely champagne dill atop them.

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