Thank God for VOD! – The Nightmare

I don’t get to go to the movies as often as I’d like to, but that doesn’t mean I can’t watch awesome flicks at home. Thank God for VOD!

thenightmareThe Nightmare

Endless Loop: Chi Mai

enniomorriconeHave you ever had one of those songs that gets stuck in your head for days…weeks…years? Sure you have. These are the songs that always make the cut. The songs on repeat. We all have them. I have a ton. Welcome back to Endless Loop.

“Chi Mai” by Ennio Morricone

The Joup Friday Album: The Phantom of the Paradise OST

phantomofparadiseTwo years before he tackled Carrie in 1976 to open himself up to a much wider audience, Brian De Palma made the absolutely bonkers musical/rock opera/horror schlock film The Phantom of the Paradise. The movie is a take on The Phantom of the Opera and Faust, but taking place within the music industry. William Finley plays the wide-eyed Winslow Leach, an aspiring music composer and singer whose songs catch the eyes and ears of satanic record producer and club promoter Swan, played wonderfully and devilishly (pun absolutely intended) by Paul Williams. From there, we have love, betrayal, murder, mutilation, a deal with the devil, and a string of grand, rock and roll music numbers.

Thank God for VOD! – Late Phases

I don’t get to go to the movies as often as I’d like to, but that doesn’t mean I can’t watch awesome flicks at home. Thank God for VOD!

latephasesLate Phases

Werewolves are the redheaded stepchild of horror movies. While vampires and zombies get all the celluloid, accolades, and cold hard cash in our movie theaters and on our TV screens, werewolves are unjustly delegated to roles in crappy action franchises and ridiculous young adult garbage. It’s not fair. Where are the good werewolf movies? Where are the flicks I want to see? Where’s the meat? Sure, there are some great films out there like John Landis’s An American Werewolf in London, or Joe Dante’s The Howling, or Neil Marshall’s Dog Soldiers, but we need more of them. Werewolves need more. Werewolves deserve more.

Underrated: State of Grace (1990)

In the pantheon of great crime cinema that came out of the 1990s I have always felt that there is one movie that is criminally underrated. What better topic then, for an addition to the column fellow Joup writer Tommy introduced several months ago. I give you then, the next installment of UNDERRATED.

The Joup 2014 Year-End Blow-Out Spectacular: Tommy’s Picks

So we’ve reached the end of another year, and we’re all a little older, a little wiser, and starting to go a little gray…at least I am. Looking back, it seems like a whole lot of terrible shit went down this year, and it most certainly did. Ebola is wreaking havoc in Africa and rearing its ugly mug stateside, we keep losing airplanes, there are naked pictures of everyone everywhere, the Cold War is beginning anew, and race relations seem to be in the same state that they were 50 years ago. It’s all a mess. And it’s enough to make you want to turn in and just escape the world. And to a degree, that’s what we do, and that’s what we’re all about. So, horrible introductions aside, I still consumed a lot of pop culture this year, and as to whether it served as some sort of escape or not doesn’t really matter. I still listened to it. I still watched it. I still read it. These are the things I liked the most…

Your Fucked Up Childhood #3: The Snowman

tumblr_inline_nfzu25X0UK1qzwijzLooking forward to it snowing this year? No?! Can you pinpoint the exact moment at which your sense of wonder blackened, crumbled and blew away on the breeze? Maybe it was the day you saw Channel 4’s 1982 animated adaptation of Raymond Briggs’ ‘The Snowman’. Every time the subject of snow comes up at this time of year I inevitably end up gnawing on the knuckles of my clenched fist as a means of both plugging my mouth and preventing me from raining a flurry of punches upon those balking at the fact that this astonishing annual phenomenon might prevent them from, wait for it, getting to work.

3 of 1112345...10...Last »

Translate