Joup Confessions… Slipknot

MrBungle_CD_Cover

Note: The “Confessions” aspect of this piece pertains to Slipknot, not Mr. Bungle. I’m still a little iffy about talking about how much I like the first Slipknot record. I shout my Bungle-ness from the highest mountains!

…………………………..

After actively dismissing them for several years following Slipknot’s 1999 eponymous debut was released I eventually finally gave in to the fact that I could not deny that there is a certain power to the record. This recognition in the face of all my cons – real or imagined – began with an inability – no matter how hard I tried – to dismiss the track Eyeless, forever erroneously known to me by the bastardized name Marlon Brando’s Eyes. 

Thee Comic Column #109: Southern Bastards Just Blew My Mind

STK652986I dug Jason Aaron and Jason Latour‘s Southern Bastards from the first issue, but only in a very peripheral way. And for the record, I don’t mean that in a negative way at all. It was actually A Voice in the Dark‘s Larime Taylor, back when he guested on Drinking with Comics, that brought Southern Bastards to my attention, and after picking up and reading issue #1 I ear-marked it as a series to follow. A lot of that was based on how striking and original Mr. Latour’s art and colors were, coupled with the fact that I had previously loved Mr. Aaron’s Scalped, a series I unfortunately still have not completed to this day (it’s in the works…). However, as you may have noticed if you read this column there are a lot of series I follow, and in the tide of my weekly stacks – stacks that seem to grow exponentially month by month – Southern Bastards was a book that I bought but didn’t read for the next few months. When I bought issue #4 I finally caught up, and by the end of it I was a little shocked at the direction some things had taken, not even realizing the… um, how to do this without spoilers… severity of what had happened to one of the characters in the book. Until I picked up issue #5 the other day. After reading the first few pages of that one, well, let’s just say my jaw hit the freakin’ ground.

The Joup Friday Album: Mastodon – Once More ‘Round the Sun

mastodononcemoreroundthesuncdFor almost nine years I have told people in Los Angeles that the fabled LA traffic nightmare everyone considers so dire is actually nothing compared to Chicago traffic. I’ve clung to this statement, scoffing at traffic here in LALA land. For Five of those years it was easy – my daily commute rarely took me on more than about a three mile stint of the 110 Harbor Freeway, all down near its end, where the freeway becomes Gaffey St. Then, in the back half of 2011 I switched jobs and began a three year and counting relationship with the 405 Freeway. Still I clung to the idea that it wasn’t that bad – certainly not as maddening as commuting during rush hour in Chicago. I start work super early in the morning so my morning commute is usually fairly easy, and I get off at 2:30 in the afternoon, so again, for the first two years of this commute I didn’t deal with anything all that bad. Then, about a year ago the commute became noticeably, exponentially worse. 2:30 PM on a Monday or Tuesday usually still isn’t that bad, but Thursday? Friday?

Thee Comic Column #108: Karen Traviss’ G.I.Joe

FallofGIJOEIf you read this column at all regularly you’ve probably heard me talk about Larry Hama’s seminal run on the original GIJOE for Marvel Comics during the 1980’s. You’ll also know that I LOVED Mike Costa’s Cobra/Cobra Files series in all its iterations since IDW picked up the license to coincide with the first Joe movie in 2009. However, with the IDW books, COBRA was where I stopped. There was a regular monthly Joe book as well, one that followed the actual GIJOE team, and there was a Snake Eyes book – love the character but this seemed a bit excessive and in danger of watering down ol’ Snakes – and maybe another book or two at different times. IDW has launched and re-launched a lot of Joe books since 2009 and through it all I breathed deeply and repeated my mantra, “Follow the writer. Follow the writer.” That, along with the fact that they were smart enough to never jettison the carefully plotted continuity they had established over the course of five years, kept me interested.

Thee Comic Column #107: Drinking with Yost and Kyle’s New X-men in the Midwest!

86871-18078-105907-1-new-x-menNo, unfortunately this isn’t going to be a post about how I was able to film some segments of Drinking with Comics in Chicago and Dayton, the way I had planned to on my recent trip. However, just because I forgot to bring the proper sound equipment with me and thus didn’t get any usable footage doesn’t mean that I wasn’t drinking good beer and talking comics a large percentage of the time I was there. Chicago especially is where the idea for the show came from – late night parties with my friends where we’d inevitably end up clustered in the kitchen (why always the kitchen?) talking about Teenagers from Mars, Preacher, Sandman and of course debating the value of the superhero franchises at any given moment. It was a long trip – a great trip but seeing as it put me back down in LALAland this past Monday at the tip of an eleven day in-a-row work stretch it has also been an exhausting one. I spent eleven days in Chicago – mostly in the forested south suburbs – and then hitched a Greyhound bus to Dayton, Ohio where I crammed eleven songs with four friends – most of us having never played with each other before – and then did a gig on November 1st – el dia de los muertos. It was a great ride, lots of fun but…

The Joup Friday Album: Tune-yards – WHOKILL

tuneyardswhokillcoverThere is a band that is doing something unlike any other band out there. I’d say they are the future of popular music but that’s a stupid knee-jerk reactionary statement that makes absolutely no sense and actually diminishes the band because, well, the future of popular music should be so good. That band is Tune-yards and they are making some of the most interesting music I have heard in years. And while their two newest records – 2011’s WHOKILL and this year’s Nikki Nack – are both great examples of the classic philosophy that presupposes to treat the musical album as an artistic statement they are also considerably eclectic, strange even when compared to modern rock/popular music.

Joop Confessions…

Christopher_crossI can’t claim to dig an entire record by Christopher Cross, probably not even all of his singles. However, there’s a handful of this guy’s music that, when time and space are properly aligned, I dig. Part of this is no doubt nostalgia. Part of it though is that I think Cross’ brand of Adult Contemporary-meets-Pop Rock wasn’t so much the former at the time but the latter. I’m pretty sure that when this guy was releasing music the term “Adult Contemporary” didn’t even exist. I think it was eventually made to accommodate Cross and his peers. This particular strain of rock is very much where a certain niche of “artists” in the early 80s headed after Michael McDonald segued out of The Doobie Bros. and hit it big making slightly atmospheric soundtrack music for aging hippies seduced from their thoughts of changing the world by thoughts of changing their income tax bracket by glombing onto the watered-down trappings of the “New Age” (or as I like to call it “Failed Hippy”) movement. You know New Age- that sinister pointlessness that, for a certain demographic in the early 80s replaced taking acid and holding sit-ins with taking cocaine, moving to New York City and selling candles and cassettes containing mantras. ALL of that baggage appears present in Christopher Cross’s music, but the funny thing is, after hating this for most of my life I’ve subsequently found, not so much a redeeming quality to it as an interesting musical archeological imprint from it.

18 of 43« First...10...1617181920...3040...Last »

Translate